Avoid Venous Disease with Healthy Weight

Healthy eating habits and body weight affect many aspects of your life, and that includes the tendency to develop venous disease and its complications. Some people overlook the value of moderate weight in preventing or controlling vein and circulation problems. Let this blog post provide you with yet another incentive to maintain healthy weight, eat right and get daily exercise.

How Does Weight Affect Venous Disease?

Most people are aware that excess weight can put strain on your joints and put you at risk for diseases like diabetes, high blood pressure and heart problems. But overweight also places stress on other bodily systems, including the vascular system. Excess weight can make you more likely to develop abnormal veins, venous reflux, bulging, varicose veins and blood clots. Here’s how it happens: 

  • Overweight literally adds external physical pressure to your circulatory system. The pressure can even limit or cut off blood flow to your lower body if you remain seated for a significant length of time. Anyone, no matter their weight, however, should alternate sitting, standing and walking to prevent circulatory problems. 
  • Overweight also makes it more difficult for your blood to travel back to your heart and lungs from your extremities. The extra weight makes venous reflux (due to malfunctioning valves within your veins) more likely. That’s because your blood already must fight gravity to get back up to the cardiopulmonary system. Your overall health is at risk if your blood cannot adequately return to pick up more oxygen and nutrients and redistribute them throughout your body. Instead, you can end up with blood pooling in your lower legs, swollen ankles, bulging varicose veins, dangerous DVT blood clots (deep vein thrombosis) and more. 
  • Weak muscles from lack of exercise and/or excess weight further aggravate vein disease, because strong muscles help move blood against gravity. Without the muscle support in your legs and with extra body weight to deal with, your vein valves can become overwhelmed and malfunction, causing vein problems and painful symptoms. 

Is Venous Disease Preventing You from Exercising?

It can be a vicious circle if you have venous disease and are overweight. Let your local vascular surgeon help. If you have leg pain from venous disorders, your vein doctor in Columbus MO can help you to regain normal circulation and eliminate leg pain, swelling and other symptoms of vein problems. As your vein health improves, you will find it easier to get regular exercise and keep vein disease from getting worse in future. 

At The Columbus Vein Center, we offer personalized vein treatment for your vein disease. Make an appointment at our Columbus MO vein clinic and let us help you find the right vascular disease solution for you. Contact us today.

How Sclerotherapy Treats Venous Disease

For millions of patients, venous disease is no laughing matter.  It shows itself as unattractive, sometimes bulging blood vessels that can be painful.  One of the primary treatment options vein specialists offer is sclerotherapy.

Venous Disease Treatment Options

Unsightly, diseased leg veins can rob a person of self-confidence.  In some cases, discomfort makes it impossible to go about typical daily activities. 

The source of this venous problem is defective vein valves that allow blood to fall backward in the extremities, pool, and stretch vein walls.  The Office on Women’s Health reveals that up to 55 percent of American females and as many as 45 percent of males suffer from some kind of defective vein problem.

Most physicians who treat this problem are interventional radiologists or vascular surgeons.  They are able to offer patients a variety of treatment options:

  • Duplex ultrasound
  • VNUS closure
  • Endovenous laser treatment
  • Ambulatory phlebectomy
  • Sclerotherapy

Sclerotherapy is considered by many to be the gold standard of care for spider veins.  Physicians also use it to treat some small varicose veins.

How Sclerotherapy Works

Sclerotherapy is an outpatient procedure.  Most patients undergo this treatment at a vein clinic.  The treating physician uses a fine needle to inject a special solution called a sclerosant into each targeted vessel.  According to the Mayo Clinic, the sclerosant irritates the vein’s walls to the point where they scar before collapsing on each other, then close the vein. 

Once the vessel is shut, blood that normally passed through it is diverted to nearby healthy veins.  The University of Chicago Medicine indicates that the targeted vessel fades as it resorbs into the body.  Patients note positive results from a few weeks to a few months after treatment, depending on the size of the veins that underwent sclerotherapy.

Patients recline with their legs elevated during the procedure.  Most report little bruising or discomfort.  After administering the injections, the doctor massages the treated area and applies compression to it. 

Once patients have had a short rest, the staff encourages them to get up and walk.  Physicians typically prescribe wearing a compression stocking on a treated leg for a few weeks.  Except for strenuous activities, most patients pick up their normal routines as soon as they return home.

Since spider veins lie closer to the skin’s surface and are smaller than varicose vessels, they are the easier of the two types of veins to treat with sclerotherapy.  Physicians often use ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy to find vessels significantly below the surface of the skin.  This technique permits the specialist to confirm proper needle placement and to monitor the administration of the sclerosant.

Some veins require more than a single injection.  While sclerotherapy is highly effective, it will not prevent the formation of new abnormal veins.  As a result, some individuals opt to return periodically for additional sessions.

 

Venous Disease: What You Need to Know about Chronic Venous Insufficiency (CVI)

Venous Disease: What You Need to Know about Chronic Venous Insufficiency (CVI)

The venous disease known as chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) affects the veins of your body. CVI is common, according to the Society for Vascular Surgery, possibly affecting up to 40 percent of people living in the United States.

The phrase ‘venous insufficiency’ means some of the veins do not work as well as they should. Chronic venous insufficiency means the condition will cause problems for a long time.

CVI – A Chronic Venous Disease

Arteries carry oxygen-rich blood from your heart to the rest of your body. Cells use this oxygen to perform various tasks. As they work, cells create waste, including carbon dioxide and other toxic byproducts. Blood carries these waste products away, clearing space for more oxygen.

Veins carry blood from your body cells back to your heart. Unlike arteries that get a little help from gravity to move blood downwards from your heart to your feet, your veins have to fight the force of gravity to carry it back upwards.

To help them keep blood moving in the right direction, veins have one-way valves that trap blood in small segments of the blood vessels in between heartbeats. These valves prevent gravity from pulling your blood downwards into your lower legs and feet.

In time, these valves can weaken and begin to function poorly. This allows blood to flow backwards and downwards, and eventually accumulate in your lower legs and feet. Blood pools in the veins in your lower extremities, causing pressure within those veins. Your body responds to the pressure by expanding the veins; bloated veins near the surface of your skin appear as bulging, twisted varicose veins.

The affected veins do a poor job of circulating blood. Instead of moving blood back up to the heart, the affected veins remain filled with oxygen-poor blood. In other words, the venous system becomes insufficient.

Malfunctioning valves are the most common cause of chronic venous insufficiency, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, but blood clots can also cause CVI. Certain risk factors can increase the likelihood that you will develop CVI, including:

  • Age – the risk for CVI increases as you get older
  • Family history of CVI
  • Being female
  • History of blood clots, also known as deep vein thrombosis, in your legs
  • Obesity
  • Pregnancy
  • Sitting or standing for long periods
  • Tall height

Vein doctors can diagnose and treat CVI. Diagnosis involves an examination of the veins in your legs and gathering a medical and family history, and may include a duplex ultrasound to evaluate your circulation. Treatment can include elevating your legs, regular exercise, wearing compression stockings, and undergoing medical treatments, such as VNUS Closure and EVLT.

If you think you have chronic venous insufficiency, make an appointment with your local vein doctor.

Venous Disease: What to Know about Chronic Venous Insufficiency (CVI)

Venous Disease: What to Know about Chronic Venous Insufficiency (CVI)

The venous disease known as chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) affects the veins of your body. CVI is common, according to the Society for Vascular Surgery, possibly affecting up to 40 percent of people living in the United States.

The phrase ‘venous insufficiency’ means some of the veins do not work as well as they should. Chronic venous insufficiency means the condition will cause problems for a long time.

CVI – A Chronic Venous Disease

Arteries carry oxygen-rich blood from your heart to the rest of your body. Cells use this oxygen to perform various tasks. As they work, cells create waste, including carbon dioxide and other toxic byproducts. Blood carries these waste products away, clearing space for more oxygen.

Veins carry blood from your body cells back to your heart. Unlike arteries that get a little help from gravity to move blood downwards from your heart to your feet, your veins have to fight the force of gravity to carry it back upwards.

To help them keep blood moving in the right direction, veins have one-way valves that trap blood in small segments of the blood vessels in between heartbeats. These valves prevent gravity from pulling your blood downwards into your lower legs and feet.

In time, these valves can weaken and begin to function poorly. This allows blood to flow backwards and downwards, and eventually accumulate in your lower legs and feet. Blood pools in the veins in your lower extremities, causing pressure within those veins. Your body responds to the pressure by expanding the veins; bloated veins near the surface of your skin appear as bulging, twisted varicose veins.

The affected veins do a poor job of circulating blood. Instead of moving blood back up to the heart, the affected veins remain filled with oxygen-poor blood. In other words, the venous system becomes insufficient.

Malfunctioning valves are the most common cause of chronic venous insufficiency, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, but blood clots can also cause CVI. Certain risk factors can increase the likelihood that you will develop CVI, including:

  • Age – the risk for CVI increases as you get older
  • Family history of CVI
  • Being female
  • History of blood clots, also known as deep vein thrombosis, in your legs
  • Obesity
  • Pregnancy
  • Sitting or standing for long periods
  • Tall height

Vein doctors can diagnose and treat CVI. Diagnosis involves an examination of the veins in your legs and gathering a medical and family history, and may include a duplex ultrasound to evaluate your circulation. Treatment can include elevating your legs, regular exercise, wearing compression stockings, and undergoing medical treatments, such as VNUS Closure and EVLT.

If you think you have chronic venous insufficiency, make an appointment with your local vein doctor.

Treatment Options for Venous Disease

Venous disease is a common condition that affects millions of people across the nation. The symptoms of this condition can be bothersome, and many people suffering from venous disease are embarrassed of their appearance. Fortunately, several treatment options exist for people with this condition.

Venous Disease Basics

The term "venous disease" is used to describe any condition affecting the veins. However, the most common manifestation of venous disease is venous reflux, which occurs when the valves in the veins are no longer working properly. Once these valves fail, blood can flow backward and pool in the veins, leading to swelling, pain and a change in the appearance of the affected veins. When these abnormal veins are smaller and close to the surface of the skin, they are referred to as "spider veins." Larger, more painful abnormal veins are known as "varicose veins."

Exploring Treatment Options

A variety of treatment options exist for patients suffering from spider veins and/or varicose veins. Some of the treatment options available include:

VNUS Closure

The VNUS closure procedure treats abnormal veins with radiofrequency energy, causing them to seal off and force blood into healthier veins. During the procedure, a thin catheter is threaded into abnormal veins and used to deliver the energy into the veins’ walls. 

Endovenous Laser Therapy

Endovenous laser therapy works by treating abnormal veins with laser energy. Much like VNUS closure, this procedure requires the use of a thin catheter to deliver the energy into the veins.

Ambulatory Phlebectomy

Ambulatory phlebectomy eliminates all symptoms associated with varicose veins immediately by removing these veins from the body entirely. During an ambulatory phlebectomy procedure, the surgeon makes small incisions in the skin near the affected vein and pulls it out of the body in pieces with small surgical hooks. 

Sclerotherapy

Sclerotherapy is a common procedure that can be used on both varicose veins and spider veins. This procedure involves the use of an injectable solution that irritates the walls of the vein, eventually forcing it to collapse. Sclerotherapy can be performed with and without ultrasound guidance.

All of the treatment options listed above are minimally invasive and carry only a limited risk of complications. To learn more about these procedures, please contact Columbus Vein Center.

Tips for Choosing the Best Clinic for Venous Disease Treatment

Nobody wants to learn that they have venous disease, but there is plenty of help if you have it. Vascular surgeons are trained in diagnosing and treating all types of vein disease. You can choose a vein clinic if you want treatment for varicose veins or other venous disease, whether your concern is how you look or how you feel. Since there are so many options available, these are some tips to help you choose the best facility for your venous disease treatment.

Consider the credentials of the vascular surgeons.

All vascular surgeons are medical doctors, but you can dig a little deeper into their credentials and experience. You can find out about fellowships and residencies in specialties such as diagnostic and interventional radiology. You can also check their board certifications and memberships in professional organizations such as the American Board of Radiology.

Ask about experience such as how many patients they typically treat in a week or month, and whether many of their patients have the same kind of venous disease as you. That way, you can be sure the Columbus vein doctors are familiar with your condition.

Don’t settle.

You are not obligated to select the first clinic or doctor you contact. Nor must you go with the second, third, or even fourth clinic or vein doctor. Keep looking until you find a clinic and doctor you are certain are best for you. You do not need to have a specific reason to pass up one doctor for another. It is okay to go with your gut. Treatment goes better when you are comfortable and confident in your choice.

Check the possible treatment options.

Proper treatment for venous disease depends on the type of disease you have. Large varicose veins, for example, may be best treated with ambulatory phlebectomy, while small spider veins may require sclerotherapy for best results. As you look into the different vein clinics for your treatment, ask about the possible treatment options the vein doctors may recommend to make sure the facility is equipped to handle your condition.

Find a Columbus vein clinic with supportive services.

Medical care and venous disease do not happen in a vacuum. Chances are, you will have better results if you feel a great amount of overall support. If possible, look for a facility with hours that are convenient to you and that promises individual attention and care. You can also check prices, since quality of care is not always dependent on the amount you pay for it.

Take advantage of other patients’ experiences.

Go online to read patient reviews of the clinic you are considering. You can gather a lot of helpful information from patients who have been in your shoes before. Not every online review is credible or helpful, but many are. Reading several reviews can help you get a feel for the clinic or doctor you are considering.

Venous Disease Requires the Right Treatment

When you struggle with varicose veins and spider veins, it can really be upsetting. Not only do they not look nice, but having these kinds of problems can indicate the potential for venous disease.  Fortunately, there are treatments available for vein disease issues, so you can look and feel better, and so you can also be healthier. Getting treatment means that you’ll have improved circulation, which can be very important, and you may even like the way your legs look again. Before you get treatment, you need to find a Columbus vein treatment clinic that you feel good about. It’s important that you see a doctor and medical staff you’re comfortable with, and that you can all of your questions answered.

Working With Columbus Vein Doctors

Choosing the right Columbus vein clinic may mean talking to a few different doctors, so you feel like you have someone who understands your concerns. Patients can be nervous about Ohio vein treatment, and finding the right doctor to help perform the procedure can reduce that nervousness and make things much easier. You have several treatment options to choose from, so you can consider which one is going to be the best for you. Most of the available options are minimally invasive, so you won’t have a lot of discomfort from them. Your down time will be short, too, and many people go back to work in a day or two. They also go back to their hobbies and normal activities, as well.

By working with your doctor, you can get all the information you need to make an informed decision on which procedure is going to be the best choice for your needs. Everyone is different, and your individual situation will be the focus of your doctor’s recommended treatment. How severe your vein disease is, if there are underlying factors that need to be treated, how many veins require treatment, and other factors will all matter, so you get the treatment that’s tailored to you.

Vascular Surgeons Can Help You Feel Better

When you get the right treatment for you, you’ll feel a lot better. There many be a little bit of swelling and bruising, but those problems will go away after a few days. Then you’ll see a big improvement in the way your legs look. You should also start to notice that they feel better, too, and that you don’t have the pain, aching, restlessness, itching, and other discomfort that you had before your treatment. That can take a little while to go away, and you may need more than one treatment, but over time the look and the feel of your legs will improve. Your circulation will also get better, reducing your chances of other health problems.

ColumbusVein Clinic

What You Need to Know About Venous Disease

Venous disease, also known as vein disease, is an umbrella term for a number of diseases that affect veins. Vein disease can cause problems in your circulatory system, preventing blood from moving efficiently through the furthest extremities of the body. In some cases, vein disease causes varicose veins, spider veins and other cosmetic problems. In other cases, vein disease causes serious medical problems. Fortunately, treatment for venous disease safely and effectively addresses vein disease to restore circulation, improve esthetic appearance and get you back on your feet.

 

Columbus Vein Doctors Discuss Common Types of Venous Disease

The venous surgeons at Columbus Vein Clinic want you to know about the most common types of venous disease, including varicose veins, spider veins, blood clots, deep vein thrombosis and more.

Varicose veins are a type of abnormal, dilated blood vessel that appears as a thick, blue, twisted cord in the back of your legs. Spider veins are also abnormal dilated blood vessel, but typically appear as thin red or blue squiggly lines on the legs, ankles, face or elsewhere on your body.

Blood clots help to stop a cut from bleeding, but they can also lodge inside your blood vessels to prevent oxygen-rich blood from reaching vital organs. Blood clots can occur in your legs, arms, veins of internal organs or in your lungs. These are serious conditions that may be life threatening.

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a condition where a blood clot occurs in a deep vein, usually in the upper or lower extremities. DVT itself is not life threatening but the clot can break off and move through the bloodstream to a vital organ.

Superficial venous thrombosis is a condition where a blood clot occurs in a vein close to the surface of the skin. These blood clots rarely travel to the lungs but they can be painful.

Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is a common condition where the circulatory system struggles against gravity to move blood upwards and out of the feet and lower legs. Signs and symptoms of CVI include pooling of blood, chronic leg swelling, color changes in the skin around the ankles.

CVI can cause venous stasis ulcers, which are painful sores that develop on your lower legs and ankles. These ulcers are the result of blood pooling in the lower legs, unable to deliver oxygen-rich blood to body cells there or carry away the toxic byproducts these cells product. The stagnant blood causes tissue cells to deteriorate, creating an open wound. Because the ulcer never gets fresh oxygen and is always steeped in toxins, the sore is slow to heal.

If you have venous disease, make an appointment for Ohio vein treatment.